Creating the Greenest City: Vancouver 2020 Action Plan

We all want to live in a city that is vibrant, affordable, and sustainable. We value the beauty of our natural setting, and rely on the prosperity that has been created from our abundant natural resources.

The Greenest City 2020 Action Plan (GCAP) for Vancouver builds on the 2009 work of Mayor Gregor Robertson’s Greenest City Action Team. This group of local experts researched best practices from leading green cities around the world, and established the goals and targets that would make Vancouver the world’s Greenest City.

During the development of the GCAP, many people gave their time and ideas. More than 35,000 people from around the world participated in the process online, through social media, and in face-to-face workshops or events. More than 9,500 people, most of whom lived in Vancouver, actively added their ideas, insights, and feedback to help determine the best path to achieve this plan.

The race to become the Greenest City in the world is both a friendly and fierce competition. It’s friendly because when one city succeeds, we all benefit from the shared knowledge and improved health of our planet, as well as the new opportunities that emerge in the green economy. The race is a fierce one because the stakes are so high. In fact, the kind of change needed for all of us to thrive in healthy and prosperous communities requires a world full of Greenest Cities.

For further information: vancouver.ca/greenestcity

 

World’s Largest Rooftop Farm Planned for Brooklyn Making New York the Model for Urban Agriculture

A multi-acre farm will be built on 100,000 square feet of rooftop space in Brooklyn’s Sunset Park—making it the largest rooftop farm in the world.

The state-of-the-art, hydroponic greenhouse is being built by BrightFarms, Inc. in partnership with Salmar Properties LLC. The farm will grow up to 1 million pounds of local produce per year, including tomatoes, lettuces and herbs, which will cultivate a new national model for urban agriculture.

The rooftop farm will be built on Federal Building #2, renamed Liberty View Industrial Plaza, an 8-story 1.1 million-square-foot warehouse building. Salmar Properties’ redevelopment of the building, coupled with BrightFarms’ visionary rooftop design, is part of the Bloomberg administration’s plan to revitalize Brooklyn’s industrial waterfront.

The rooftop farm will both help revitalize the building and revolutionize local produce. It will grow enough crops to meet the fresh vegetable consumption needs of up to 5,000 New Yorkers, create jobs, and prevent as much as 1.8 million gallons of storm water from going into local waterways. By eliminating the length and complexity of the produce supply chain, this farm will grow produce that is fresher, tastier, and more sustainable than produce shipped across the country.

“The partnership between BrightFarms and Salmar Properties to build the world’s largest rooftop farm is an exciting new model for sustainable, urban agriculture,” says New York City Council Speaker, Christine C. Quinn. “The farm will contribute meaningfully to the mission of FoodWorks, my vision to improve NYC’s food system by dramatically increasing local food production while positively affecting public health, the economy, and the environment.”

For further information: brightfarms.com

 

Trends from Brooklyn NYC Garden Centre “Sprout Home”

Interview with gardener Ben Sinclair from “Sprout Home” in Brooklyn NYC. Talking about local gardening- and urban gardening trends and innovations of the Big Apple for spring 2012.

Outstanding and coming up at the point of sale this year spring: wooden containers, in house seeding, backyard garden or roof top eco systems with bat boxes and bat guano from “Dr. Earth”, fungus like “Grow Your Own Mushroom Garden” from Oakland based award winning company “Back To The Roots” and mason bee kits from “Crown bees”.

New trends from Brooklyn NYC Garden Centre “Rose, Red & Lavender”

Sustainability gardening trends from environmentally influenced garden centre “Rose, Red & Lavender” in Williamsburg, Brooklyn NYC. Interview with owner Kimberly Sevilla talking about the trends for spring 2012, specialities in urban gardening like her own fruit stocks, locally grown seeds, coconut based products, popular in demand Mint, peat free ORGANIC MECHANICS® Premium Blend Potting Soil, seeds and her own point of sale philosophy.

Kimberly worked as a research scientist with the Department of Agriculture and has studied gardening techniques worldwide. She and her staff have carefully selected plants that will thrive in urban gardens and in your homes.

 Further information: roseredandlavender.com

Urban farming in Brooklyn, New York: 596 acres

Brooklyn is one of the five biggest districts of New York: More than 2,5 million people live here. The city of New York owns thousands of slivers of unused land, and about a year ago, a group of Brooklyn gardeners had an idea: identify all the vacant lots in the borough, then help neighborhood residents take them over.

They built an online map, then a mobile app with information about the plots, including the names and phone numbers of the agencies that owned them. They called themselves “596 ACRES”, after the total area of unused public land in Brooklyn, according to city data 2010. If even a small portion of that was committed to neighborhood food production, there would be an abundance of fresh seasonal vegetables to eat. And think of all the grassy parks and composting sites!

For further information: 596acres.org