Purely native Down Under

A garden needs water, of course. It even needs lots of water when temperatures rise to subtropical or tropical in summer. But what, if there is hardly any water for watering the garden plants? Gardeners in Australia know the answer.

Water is a big issue and it even is the issue in some regions of this constantly dry country. However, the severe lack of water is no reason at all for laid-back Aussies to do without a garden – above all, they need a decent place for their fancied BBQs. That charcoal smoke wafting along the warm summer breeze is an integral part of the Australian culture. Good food, cool beer, groovy tunes, good company and a nice garden to celebrate the BBQ is Australian for having a good time. All this works perfectly fine with the most favourite garden trend Down Under: Re-creating wilderness. This type of garden is best characterised by giving Mother Nature full scope and experiencing the unexpected. It only works well with native plants for these plants are drought-tolerant and able to retain moisture. At the same time re-creating wilderness saves a lot of time, as it does not require a lot of gardening. The traditional European image of a garden with its imposed order and neatly cultivated flowerbeds are hardly found in Australia. Although the re-created wilderness is mainly due to the water scarcity, Aussie gardeners foster it as the celebration of the unique Australian flora and fauna. Especially the latter can also be a menace. Various insects and caterpillars as well as opossums and snakes are the most unwanted creatures in Australian gardens. Therefore, many blog posts deal with “know your enemy”, i.e. giving advice for keeping these animals off the garden. Gardening is just slightly different Down Under.

More Information:
newsroom.husqvarna.com
australianbbqsociety.com

 

French gardens: Poetry in motion

It’s Gallic! A garden is a garden, but in France it is not that simple. The country seems to be full of Gardens of Eden and thus gardening is a highly emotional thing to do in the land of wine, baguettes and camembert.

For the average French garden lover gardening is something he could never do without. It is an inherent human need, a heart’s desire, a basic want. Thus, French bloggers tend to express their passionate fascination for gardening in a very poetic way. It is not just the garden itself that causes this rapture, but it is the practice of gardening, it is letting flowers, herbs and vegetables grow, it is experiencing Mother Nature – something a French garden lover would never call work. For him it is the creation of a sense of harmony and it is the connection of mankind with its origins. Consequently, their favourite garden trend is the feel-good garden. Especially for women the garden is a place where they can forget daily routines and the pressures of professional life. While relaxing and dreaming in their feel-good gardens many French wish their garden was much larger. However, also in France a lush and spacious garden is something for the upper class. Nevertheless, the French love their gardens – even if they are small – and corresponding to their mentality they endeavour to make the best of it. Thus, those who can’t have a large garden consider a kitchen garden as an interesting and affordable alternative. And again, bloggers who report about their kitchen garden on the web find very poetic words to describe it, for instance harvesting is magic, it’s best of the earth’s energy or listening to the voice of nature. It’s just French.

More Information: newsroom.husqvarna.com

 

Denmark, the land of garden parties

Danes are known for their Scandinavian laid-back mentality coupled with a strong joy of living. Their gardens play a vital role in their social life, because it is their favourite location to assemble, dine, drink and just enjoy the good things in life with friends and family. This, however, requires a special type of garden.

Due to the northern European weather conditions, Danes make full use of their gardens mainly in the summer months. The preferred Danish garden is a mixture of a social garden, a lush garden and a kitchen garden. By all means, the social aspect is being together with friends, family and neighbours outdoors. Therefore, the garden must have a pleasant ambience, and the Danish gardeners like it lush. The gardens are often colourful with playful designs and interesting artistry. The Danes tend to buck the trend and so their gardens usually reflect the nature and personality of their owners rather than any trend from a glossy garden magazine. Besides the social and lush aspects, the Danish garden must also provide enough room for growing herbs and vegetables. Unlike kitchen gardens in most other countries around the world, the Danes love experimenting with new variants of herbs and vegetables. For them, kitchen gardening is more than simply growing their own food, it is living the passion for the fine things in life: enjoying food and drink in good company. This is also reflected in most Danish blog posts and last but not least in the spending on gardening and outdoor living. On average the Danes spend 183 Euros (237 $) on their garden, which is the second highest spending per head and year on garden equipment in Europe.

More Information: newsroom.husqvarna.com

 

Gardening around the world

It is said that globalisation and modern communication techniques make our planet a smaller place. To a certain extent, this is definitely true, but still it is only half the story as can be seen when looking at garden lovers around the world.

There is one thing, apart from gardening, that gardeners all over the world have in common: Blogging and online gardening. Always in search of inspiration and advice, gardeners love to communicate with other like-minded people everywhere on the globe. The Swedish lawn-mower producer Husqvarna and the German garden equipment producer Gardena, which is also part of the Husqvarna Group, made use of the gardeners’ web affine manner and produced the Global Garden Report. Having analysed more than 1.4 million blog posts in 13 countries they received a very clear picture as to what is hot or not for garden lovers.

Although they found out that the idea of the personal garden paradise is strongly determined by different cultures and the respective zeitgeist in the particular countries, they could put up a top-ten-list of relevant garden trends. According to this list kitchen gardening is the gardeners’ favourite, followed by the organic garden and the feel-good garden. The designed and artistic garden as well as the re-creating wilderness completes the top five. The social garden, urban farming, the lush garden, container gardening and greenhouse gardening follow on positions six to ten. However, the report also reveals that what may be hot in Denmark may not in Norway. Within the next few weeks we will present summaries from the report for each of the surveyed 13 countries.

The full report is available here: newsroom.husqvarna.com

 

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