Global Garden Report 2012

Due to the continuous growth of the population in cities and urban habitats, green spaces and parks in the cities become increasingly important. The current Global Garden Report by the Husqvarna Group now confirms: More green has a positive effect on the health, stimulates the economy, strengthens the community spirit and supports the social togetherness. Thus, the creation, maintenance and care of public green spaces are getting more and more important.

The Global Garden Report is an annual study by the Husqvarna Group, scrutinising current garden trends and green topics. This year’s study looks at the significance of green spaces in urban habitats. Every year the study is carried out in seven countries by an independent scientific institute. This time, more than 3,500 urban residents have been interviewed.

Further Information: The Global Garden Report 2012 as PDF-file

 

Christoph Werner becomes Vice President in Koelnmesse trade fair management team

With Christoph Werner, 37, the Koelnmesse trade fair management team has gained a new Vice President with a broad range of trade fair experience.

As of 1st April 2012, Christoph Werner will be responsible for events in the House, Garden and Leisure sector and the Health area. Among the trade fairs in these sectors are spoga+gafa, EISENWARENMESSE – International Hardware Fair Cologne, INTERMOT Cologne, the International Dental Show (IDS) and Paint – Finishing & Facade.

Christoph Werner has occupied responsible positions in the international trade fair business for more than a decade. His first position was that of Sales Executive and Project Manager Sales at Reed Exhibitions Deutschland GmbH. He has been a project manager at Koelnmesse since April 2005. Among other trade fairs, he has been on the support teams for ProSweets Cologne and photokina.

Christoph Werner will succeed Metin Ergül, who is leaving Koelnmesse as of 31st March 2012 to take on new challenges as the managing director of a company in the healthcare market.

A garden for saving money and having fun

Today food products are to be healthy, tasty, free of harmful substances and of local origin. So, what can be more obvious than growing your own herbs and vegetables in your garden or on the balcony? It cannot be more local and healthier. Furthermore, it is great fun and saves money.

Many people follow this trend already and grow their herbs and vegetables in the own garden or on their balcony. The feasibility of growing herbs or vegetables is only limited by the size of the garden or the balcony. Tomatoes, peas, string beans and lettuce – everything is possible, for the necessary seeds are available in well-assorted garden markets. A packet of seeds for basil, chives or parsley costs about one third of a pot with a small plant of these herbs available in supermarkets.

Herbs grown in the own garden or on the balcony are definitely free of harmful substances; they are 100 per cent organic food for less money. In times of numerous scandals in the food industry, even in the organic food sector, it is, however, not just the awareness of savouring self-grown unharmful and fresh food products, which make people feel good. It is very emotional for people to grow some of their food themselves. It is great fun for them to let it grow and – in the true sense of the word – to reap the fruit of their labour. There still is a lot of potential for the seed industry in this sector.

Eden made in Russia

Life in Russia is an everyday challenge – and so is gardening there. Although gardening can be pretty difficult in Russia because of the rough climate, Russians love it and mix work with pleasure.

From the biggest challenge for Russian gardeners, i.e. the unforgiving weather, arises the second challenge: the gardening knowhow. Russian gardening bloggers have extensive knowledge of what and when to do and how to do it best in the garden. The intense exchange of information is therefore vital for achieving good results with the gardening activities. This is even more important, as the favourite trend in Russia is kitchen gardening, which is more than just nice to do, as for instance in Britain. In Russia kitchen gardening is also a sort of necessity. When the harsh Russian winter puts an end to the autumn harvest, the urban gardeners proudly enjoy their homegrown vegetables and fruits.

For Russian gardeners organic gardening is not a matter of environmental protection or health, as it avoids chemicals, but above all, it is cheap. Russians, who live in the big cities and neither have a garden nor can afford a dacha, grow the vegetables in their apartments or on the balconies. Cutting costs is an important reason for the huge popularity of kitchen and organic gardening, but it is not the only one: It is also the creativity in building a personal paradise coupled with satisfying the Russian passion for gardening. The Russian gardeners do not spend much money on their gardens; on average it is just 34 Euros (45 $) per year.

More information: newsroom.husqvarna.com

Gardening in Sweden: Women only!

Sweden is said to be one of the most modern and progressive countries in Europe. Amongst many other things, Swedes are very proud on their gender equality. However, when it comes to gardening this has no significance whatsoever.

It seems as if time stands still in Swedish gardens. Old traditions and an updated grandmother-like shape give Swedish gardens an old-fashioned, yet trendy, style. Although the country is widely known for its achievements in gender equality, this does not apply to Swedish gardens. Notwithstanding that the one of the strictest female quota in Europa was introduced for the composition of the supervisory boards of Swedish stock corporations, female Swedes love to live the old-school way in their gardens. There they regard themselves responsible for the well-being of their families and by all means is it their task to make home and garden a cosy place. Men are only allowed to carry out the hard garden work, for instance digging holes, mowing the lawn, chopping trees etc. Therefore, Swedish gardens have a pleasant female touch, which gives them a highly emotional and thus friendly identity. Swedish families are proud of their mothers und wives and appreciate all the efforts the women make for turning the garden into such a lovely place. The dominant garden trend in Sweden is a mixture of re-creating wilderness and feel-good-garden, both perfectly matching the old-fashioned style. The plants in these gardens must, of course, be very beautiful. In their garden lives, Swedish emancipated women like making jams and syrups. Thus, they also grow lots of fruits and vegetables, which they then cook and bake together with family and friends for the many garden parties during the summer season. The Swedish gardeners are the top spenders on gardening and outdoor living. On average they spend 190 Euros (250 $) per year on their gardens.

More Information: newsroom.husqvarna.com